The four deadly enemies of a Christian leader

As a Christian leader, your deadliest enemy is not the man next door who stares weirdly when you drive past to church; your worst enemy is right within.

Money: Yes, uncontrolled love and craving for money. Do you find yourself lying, cheating, swindling and even stealing in order to satisfy that insatiable urge to have more money? That enemy is out to ruin you. Face him squarely or he’ll destroy you.

Sex: What are you presently comprising just to satisfy that urge, that burning desire to be in their arms? Be sure you are not a victim of the spirit of lust or seduction, or both. That enemy will disgrace you when you least expect it.

Pride: You hate to be in a position of weakness; you always want to be at the top and in charge. You will intentionally hide the truth and engage in a lot of hypocrisy just to keep your pride. You hate to apologize even when you are sure you blew it. It’s hard for you to acknowledge you were at fault. Check your heart. That enemy will limit the extent to which God can use you.

Power: You can sacrifice everything and anything just to be “the one in charge here”. You hate to be the follower, even when you have much to learn from others. You want to teach everybody even when you’ve got nothing worth teaching. That enemy will keep you ignorant and empty, with the illusion that you know it all and can do it all. He will keep you from growing to greater heights.

We’ve got to always check our motives, re-examine our hearts each step of the journey. Our sincerity with God will earn us His timely intervention and save us  lots of future embarrassments.

I wish you the best on this journey.

 

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LEADERSHIP: THE CLASSROOM SCENARIO

Today I’ll like to look at leadership in the classroom. I’m considering the teacher to be the one in the leadership position here.

How can I lead in the classroom without becoming bossy or lousy? I’ll like to share my experiences in this area.

First of all we need to know a few truths about the youth we have under our care.

  • Students neither like nor have any respect for dictatorial teachers.
  • They are suspicious when you become too bossy.
  • They want to be heard and not seen only.
  • They want to be understood and not hated when they make jokes.
  • Undeserved punishment will provoke very negative reactions.
  • They are comfortable with teachers who sometimes come down to their level of experience without losing their own dignity.
  • They like teachers who are firm but just in their decisions; they respect such leaders.
  • Most of them are always trying to self-assert. They need to be understood and guided.

So, how do I manage my classroom as a teacher/leader in the face of the above reality?

  • Be just, but be respectful in your justice.
  • Establish the rules and never back down because you feel threatened.
  • Be firm, but avoid unjustifiable punishment.
  • Relax, smile and contribute in the joke, even when you are the target.
  • Know when to get out of the joke into more serious issues.
  • Don’t try to portray yourself as the superman who never makes mistakes; they will help you make some, and then they will laugh at you.
  • Show compassion to those who deserve it without provoking pity for them.
  • Be the example or model, but without too much self-publicity.
  • Give them their required dose, and don’t promise what you can’t afford.
  • Don’t try to please everyone. Strive to give everyone what they need.

Good luck in your teaching career. Have a positive impact on the future generation.

The same measurement you use…

We are all called to serve under some form of leadership or another. We are faced with the challenge of submitting to people who might not be as talented, wise or educated as we expect. We could be tempted to despise and even openly criticize their every move because we know better or we think we do.

We should however never fail to realize that only those who wear the shoe know where it pinches. It is easier to follow than to lead. It is easier to observe at a distance and conclude that you would do a better job if you were in the leader’s seat.

But the truth is that once you find yourself in that position you are faced with reality and variables that render your magic plan very impossible. You begin to realize that the head that wears the crown has more than an issue to deal with.

What am I saying then?

We should seek to correct, suggest, propose, call attention to things we consider out of place and even dangerous for the enterprise, home, cooperation etc. But we should do all in love, knowing that the leadership seat is not always as easy as that of the follower.

Give your leader some benefit of doubt and be kind in the way you seek to contribute. Tomorrow you could find yourself in his or her position and you may even find yourself acting the same way he did because you just realized there were variables you didn’t know about when you were still a follower.

Be the kind of follower who brings joy to leadership.